The Best Worth Watch Anime In 2022!

The year 2021 was a great one for anime, with the comeback of fan favorites like Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba, JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure, and My Hero Academia, and the debut of innovative new series like Odd Taxi, The Heike Story, Sonny Boy, and SK8 the Infinity. Popular shows like Mob Psycho 100, and Vinland Saga.

The Devil is a Part-Timer, and Bleach is all set to return in the second half of this year, suggesting that 2022 will be largely similar. And it looks like both Chainsaw Man and Uzumaki will finally be released to the public soon.

With so much to watch and so few hours in the day, we’ll be updating our list of the best 2022 anime throughout the year as new seasons premiere. Check out our current ranking of the best anime of the year and come back in the summer for an updated version! This year’s list is organized by debut date for simplicity and ease of use.

RANKING OF KINGS

The monarchs in the fantasy series Ranking of Kings are ranked according to their achievements and, more importantly, their physical might. Bojji, a small, kind-hearted young boy, is next in line to succeed his ailing father as king. Bojji isn’t particularly robust, and he has trouble speaking, so he relies heavily on sign language to express himself. His heart, however, makes up for what he may lack in personality compared to more conventional leaders.

RANKING OF KINGS
RANKING OF KINGS

He gives someone the proverbial shirt off his back in the pilot. In my opinion, Bojji is among the most sympathetic and interesting main characters in anime. In Ranking of Kings, even the most mundane of situations is imbued with the highest stakes, elevating a non-lethal spar between Bojji and his half-brother to the level of significance usually reserved for battles between the gods.

He’s the ideal protagonist because his small size and sense of wonder heighten the epic scope of a fantastical world full of golems, wizards, and giants. Although Bojji is a notable figure, he is hardly alone. David’s half-brother, Kage, is the lone member of a persecuted clan, and the two of them travel with Daida’s companion, Kage, as the latter seeks a path to power that is authentic for him.

Because of my undying devotion to Bojji, “Rating of Kings” succeeds. However, there’s more to this show than just an underdog tale. The anime, based on a manga by Sosuke Toka, has all the makings of a fantastic fantasy series: mysterious creatures, dark magic, palace intrigue, and a young boy who travels to the underworld on an epic quest. I’m only a few episodes in, but this is already an outstanding show that I highly recommend. This was written by Ana Diaz.

My Dress Up Darling

Wakana Gojo, a senior at her high school, enjoys making Hina dolls (traditional Japanese dolls), whereas Marin Kitagawa, a fan of anime and video games with a penchant for cosplay, has his own unique interests. Vivacious gyaru fashionista Marin approaches Gojo to enlist his creative assistance in creating her costume, and the two become fast friends.

My Dress Up Darling
My Dress Up Darling

The combination of Marin’s outgoing nature and Gojo’s guarded but determined outlook makes for a refreshing pairing that deviates from the typical gyaru girl and silent boy dynamic. Even if Gojo feels humiliated when taking her measurements, Marin clearly cares about him and is not trying to intentionally hurt or stress him out. I’m not sure if I should suggest My Dress-Up Darling because of the excessive quantity of fan service, but the novel’s original premise merits inclusion here. — Julia Lee

Attack On Titan Final Season Part 2

Some fans have said that the conclusion to Attack on Titan is the most divisive of the year’s best anime. Numerous articles and essays have been written about the final chapters of the Attack on Titan manga, with topics ranging from author Hajime Isayama’s inferred pro-Imperialist beliefs to the series’ unpleasant metaphorical similarities to real-life historical horrors.

Attack On Titan Final Season Part 2
Attack On Titan Final Season Part 2

With these reservations in mind, you might be wondering why Attack on Titan made the cut. The answer is straightforward: directors Jun Shishido and Yuichiro Hayashi, along with studio MAPPA, created the greatest possible animated embodiment of what is a difficult and divisive climax. The 20th and 21st episodes of the season pack some of the most apocalyptic visuals seen so far in the series, and together they undoubtedly rank as one of the most shocking shocks of any anime in recent memory.

Nothing beats being a part of a Big Anime Event, where it seems like everyone is watching every new development in the series’ ongoing climax right along with you. Despite the controversy, Attack on Titan’s final season represents not only the conclusion of one of the most important anime of the past decade but also a must-see anime event of 2022. Says Toussaint Egan

The Orbital Children

Director Mitsuo Iso, who last worked on the anime Dennou Coil nearly 15 years ago, is back with The Orbital Children, a six-episode series (released in Japan as two feature-length films) about five kids who find themselves trapped on a commercial space station on the verge of a catastrophic disaster.

The Orbital Children
The Orbital Children

Weaving a coming-of-age story about five kids who find themselves on the cusp of humanity’s journey into the immense unknown of space, Iso and company create a dizzying tapestry of complex world-building brought to life through breathtaking animation. This is a fantastic anime with a lot going on visually, and it pays off for both careful first-time viewers and those who stick with it for multiple episodes.

Healer Girl

One may be thankful for the existence of Healer Girl if, theoretically, we were experiencing a year that felt at times interminably gloomy. Following three young girls as they train to become “voice medicine” healers, the original anime was directed by Yasuhiro Irie. They use the healing power of music, composed specifically for each patient, to alleviate their symptoms. Similarly, Healer Girl is a staple in my anime viewing schedule. It’s quaint, self-contained, self-sustaining, and hospitable.

Healer Girl
Healer Girl

Trust that the show’s art direction provides its own rich rewards, even if that’s not the exact selling point everyone’s looking for in their shjo experiences. When capturing a scene, Irie skilfully shifts focus between the minute details and the big picture to find the most evocative perspectives.  With this and the episode-by-episode lush, wonderful singing montages set to fresh bops, Healer Girl is needed (and easy) appeal in a harsh, harsh world. Millman, Zosha

Ya Boy Kongming!

The protagonist of Ya Boy Kongming! is Zhuge Liang Kongming, a Chinese statesman and strategist from the third century who, on his deathbed, expresses a desire to be reborn in a more peaceful era. The last thing Kongming expects is to wake up in an alley in modern-day Shibuya on Halloween night, but he gets a lot more than he bargained for.

When Kongming, who is convinced he has been transported to Hell, follows a pair of partygoers into a nightclub, he meets the part-time bartender and aspiring singer Eiko Tsukimi. When Kongming hears Eiko sing for the first time, he is so moved by the beauty of her voice that he offers to take on the role of her manager and use his legendary talents as a military tactician to oversee her nascent career. Every single Ya Boy Kongming!

Ya Boy Kongming!
Ya Boy Kongming!

episode has been a great time.

Kongming demonstrates his managerial and strategic prowess by utilizing historical military tactics to attract new audiences and thwart dishonest rivals, as well as by attracting reluctant supporters with his freestyle rapping talents. Part of the show’s charm comes from witnessing the characters develop friendships over their shared appreciation of music, and the rest comes from the belly-aching hilarity of watching Kongming try to keep up with the times despite being several hundred years behind. The series’ title tune, a Japanese cover of the Hungarian hit song “Bulikirály,” is a meme-worthy bop in its own right and features gorgeous animation to boot. —TE

Tomodachi Game

It’s easy to draw parallels between Tomodachi Game and Squid Game, what with the adolescents being sucked into a mysterious underground game, the capitalistic debt that keeps them playing, and the life-or-death stakes that anchor each episode. While the latter focuses on financial unease, the former merely utilize it as a club.

Tomodachi Game
Tomodachi Game

At first, the group of pals is misled into playing a few rounds of the “Tomodachi game” with the alluring promise that doing so could free one of them from debt. A few episodes in, though, it becomes abundantly evident that friendship, not yen, is the primary medium of exchange in Tomodachi Game. It’s only natural that there would be a lot of secrets shared among friends.

There is nothing particularly impressive about the animation in Tomodachi Game, and the rhythm can be difficult to follow at times. Seeing this anime may leave you wanting to read the manga to find out where the hell the story is headed. It’s not for everyone, of course, but if you’re anything like me and can’t help but be intrigued by interpersonal conflict, you’ll find it hard to look away. In which direction do all these fairly hot leads go? There’s nowhere decent, and I can’t wait. —ZM